Double trout fishcakes

The Scots have an inherent love of leftovers, there’s very little which we won’t re-use a second time to prevent waste. Patties are a particular favourite way of doing this and these little fish cakes are a perfect way of using the leftovers from two wonderful dishes.

Trout is one of my favourite types of fish, full of delicate yet meaty flavour. Rainbow trout are perfectly good as a staple, however when the brown trout comes into season it’s a most welcome and sight, while the majestic sea trout is possibly my most favourite fish of all. I recently went on a smoking course with Tasting Scotland to learn some techniques to use with my new smoker. Covering the full gambit of curing, brining, hot and cold smoking, I felt particularly well informed when a beautiful ‘brownie’ landed in my kitchen. I knew exactly what I was going to do; fillet it, roast one fillet, smoke the other and make a light stock from the bones.

To smoke it I first cured in a sweet whisky brine solution for an hour and then smoked on the stove using alder wood. A good native Scottish species that’s been used for housing since the days of Crannogs of the Iron Age natives. So one large fish and two meals already. But enough for a few fishcakes still remained. I love making these little patties, they never fail to conjure up childhood memories and are always packed with flavour. A perfect way to eke out the food in the larder.

Double trout fishcakes (makes 4)

100g Cooked trout (flaked)
100g Hot smoked trout (flaked)
300g-400g Mashed potatoes
Ground black pepper
Vegetable oil for frying
1 egg whisked
Coarse semolina for dusting

1. In a mixing bowl combine all ingredients with a good grinding of black pepper. Split mixture into four and make into patties around 1″ thick
2. In a shallow bowl whisk the egg and spread the semolina on a plate. Dip both sides of the patty in egg then coat with the semolina. Do this for each.
3. In a frying pan heat the oil to a high heat, brown for a minute on both sides and then cover and cook until hot. Around 4-5 minutes. Serve with tartare sauce.

If freezing the patties to cook later don’t coat until cooking.

About Graeme

I want to tell the world of the natural larder and eclectic cuisine of Scotland

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